Happy National Community Gardening Week

Earlier this month Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack proclaimed August 23-29 National Community Gardening Week to encourage Americans “to connect with the land, the food it grows and their local communities”.   I once read that Baltimore has nearly 100 community gardens.  Below is a collection of images from just a hand full of gardens in the city, but you can still get an idea of the different types of foods being grown here.

Hampden Community Garden in Roosevelt Park

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When these pictures were taken, it was over the course of some of the hottest days in Baltimore this year.  While the gardens were holding up surprisingly well, hardly a gardener could be found.

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Nasturtiums, purple greens and tomatoes among others.

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This lone pepper plant seems especially well cared for.

Druid Hill City Farms Community Garden

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Here there were some devoted gardeners braving the heat and humidity.

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Swiss chard and a late, but apparently fruitful tomato.

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An immaculate plot with abundant rosemary and squash.

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Some very healthy looking okra with attractive blooms.

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Tomatillos using a nearby leek as a trellis.

Upper Fells Point Community Garden

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The Fells Point garden is gated and unfortunately there is little visibility from the outside.  This is my only shot.

Patterson Park City Farms Community Garden

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Patterson Park has the largest community garden in Baltimore city.

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Several years ago I had a plot in Patterson Park and what I liked most about the garden was the variety of people there.  Gardeners of young and old, from different cultural and ethnic backgrounds with mixed faiths communed and great stories were told over weeding, plowing and picking.

Tinges Commons Community Garden and Public Art Space in Waverly

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Tinges Commons is one of the latest and most unique additions to Baltimore’s community garden roll.

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This small garden had the best looking selection of eggplant.

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As a dual-purpose community and public art space, here garden parties are combined with art openings.

The Village Green Community Garden in Remington

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Remington gardeners make great use of their medium sized garden with mass plantings.  Here you can find a plethora of strawberries, asparagus,  and taro among other vegetables.

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Gardeners also conserve water by keeping the garden hydrated with rainwater runoff from a nearby building.

City Hall Community Gardens

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The gardens at City Hall are one of the few locations that corn can be found growing in the city.

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The Baltimore City Hall vegetable gardens, conceived of before the Obama’s started their garden at the White House, serves to educate the public and feed the homeless.

If you are interested in joining a community garden in Baltimore city, check out the Community Greening Resource Network and contact Baltimore Parks and People Foundation for more information.

Happy National Community Gardening Week everyone!

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3 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. […] Gardening Week Don’t you Know?! Get your wellies on and your shovels out and do some digging!Joel the Urban Gardener A little bit unrelated but you’ve got to love cakes.Susie’s Shortbread’s Blog […]

  2. The City Hall corn made my day 🙂

  3. this makes me proud to be a Marylander!


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